Evaluation and Treatment of Upper Extremity Injuries in Tennis Players
Section: Academy of Hand and Upper Extremity PT
Session Code: HR-3A-4985
Date: Friday, January 25, 2019
Time: 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Marriott Marquis
Room: Marquis Salon 5

Speaker(s):   Melissa Baudo, PT, DPT
  Todd Ellenbecker, PT, DPT, MS, Board-Certified Clinical Specialist in Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy

Session Type: Educational Sessions
Session Level: Basic

Description:
Upper extremity injuries are common in the tennis athlete. The tennis serve motion and ground strokes place high demands on the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. In order to obtain optimal force production and avoid overuse of the upper extremity, the body must utilize the entire kinetic chain via a synchronous use of muscle groups, segmental rotations, and coordinated lower extremity muscle activation. The forces generated must summate and transfer from the ground up through the kinetic chain and into the ball. Poor synchronization and weak links쳌 in the kinetic chain, abnormal motor control, mobility deficits, and any alteration in biomechanics are frequently associated with shoulder, elbow, and wrist injury in the tennis athlete. The evaluation and correction of weaknesses, mobility, flexibility, motor control, and the biomechanical analysis of the tennis strokes are paramount in the treatment and prevention of upper extremity injuries. In this session, physical therapists will learn about the role of the kinetic chain in upper extremity injuries for the tennis athlete, the biomechanical demands of tennis, and an evidence-based approach to rehabilitation of common upper extremity injuries that occur in the tennis athlete, including return-to-play guidelines. The speakers also will discuss equipment modifications such as string tension, racket characteristics, vibration dampeners, Orthopaedics Sectiontics, and the role of taping.

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

1. Describe the role of the kinetic chain in upper extremity injuries in the tennis athlete.

2. Examine the biomechanical demands of tennis.

3. Describe the incidence and prevalence of shoulder, elbow, and wrist injuries in the tennis athlete.

4. Develop evidence-based, sport-specific rehabilitation programs, including the integration of equipment modifications such as string tension, racket characteristics, vibration dampeners, Orthopaedics Sectiontics, and the role of taping.

5. Describe return-to-play criteria for tennis athletes following an upper extremity injury.


CEU: 0.2






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